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The case for functional electrical stimulation (FES)

The case for FESIn a randomized controlled trial of the Odstock Dropped Foot Stimulator (ODFS) in a group of 56 people who had secondary progressive multiple sclerosis, ODFS users reported 72% fewer falls than a control group who received physiotherapy, over an 18 week period
Mann GE, Jolley CJ, Taylor PN (1)

The case for MS occupational therapy services

The case for FES FES uses electrical current to stimulate nerves and move parts of the body. It can help people with dropped foot, a symptom of MS, to walk by stimulating the muscles that lift the foot.
The case for FES FES in a non-invasive device.
The case for FES FES can facilitate greater social integration and participation in society, and in some cases support employment.
The case for FES FES can lead to significant cost savings for the NHS from prevention of injury due to falls, improved health due to increased fitness and reduction in use of other aids
The case for FES FES may be used on many areas of the upper and lower limbs....examples include improving stability when standing, reducing hand spasticity and improving hand function. There are many potential users who could benefit from increased levels of service provision in a greater number of locations
Centre for Evidence Based Purchasing, Department of Health (2)
The case for FES NICE published interventional procedure guidance (IPG278) entitled Functional electrical stimulation for drop foot of central neurological origin on 28 January 2009 (3).
The case for FES The National Service Framework for Long-term Conditions (NSF) states that people with long-term neurological conditions should receive: '...timely, appropriate assistive technology/equipment…to support them to live independently; help them with their care; maintain their health and improve their quality of life' (4).
The case for FES The National Service Framework for Long-term Conditions (NSF) places an obligation on the NHS to ensure that people with MS have access to technologies, such as FES, which can improve walking ability, increase levels of independence and enhance quality of life.
The case for FES Two recent clinical trials investigating the effects of FES on walking speed and ability in people with MS suggest that it improves walking speed and reduces walking effort in people with MS who
experience dropped foot (5).
The case for FES Anyone recommended for treatment of dropped foot with FES by a neuro-physiotherapist or
other health care professional should be able to access FES on the NHS.
How to Campaign for Access to FES, MS Society (6)
Further information  
(1) An investigation into the effect of functional electrical stimulation on mobility and quality of life in patients with Multiple Sclerosis.
Mann GE, Jolley CJ, Taylor PN. 10th Annual Conference of the International FES Society, pp. 309-311, Montreal, Canada, July 2005
Download here
(2) Functional Electrical Stimulation for Drop Foot of Central Neurological Origin - Buyers Guide. Centre for Evidence Based Purchasing, Department of Health Download here
(3) NICE Functional electrical stimulation for drop foot of central neurological origin - Interventional procedure guidance 278
Download here
(4) The National Service Framework for Long-term Conditions, 2005.
Department of Health.
Download here
(5) The effect of functional electrical stimulation on the physiological cost of gait in people with multiple sclerosis
Paul L, Rafferty D, Young S, Miller L, Mattison P, McFadyen A , Multiple Sclerosis 2008;14:954-61
(6) Download the MS Society publication 'How to Campaign for Access to FES Download here
View the MS Society's range of free publications Download here
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